The Mermology Blog . . . an interactive blog where you have your say.

PHOTO: Shark attack survivor slams shark cull

PHOTO: Shark attack survivor slams shark cull

COOL PHOTO: No Shark Cull

http://blog.oceans-campus.com/

COOL PHOTO: No Shark Cull

http://blog.oceans-campus.com/

IMAGE: Real Surfers Respect Sharks #SeaShepherd

IMAGE: Real Surfers Respect Sharks #SeaShepherd

Half Human Half Fish in Florida!!
http://arteffact.wordpress.com/

Half Human Half Fish in Florida!!

http://arteffact.wordpress.com/

IMAGE: Still can’t multi-task???!

via https://www.flickr.com/photos/noble_fan/5157893387/

IMAGE: Still can’t multi-task???!

via https://www.flickr.com/photos/noble_fan/5157893387/

Half fish, half woman
http://onesurrealistaday.com/

Half fish, half woman

http://onesurrealistaday.com/

Julia Martin Discusses The Malawian Water Project

A climate change mitigation and adaptation project in Malawi has been funded by the Scottish Government. The Scottish Government through awarded the Voluntary Service Overseas (VSO) a Grant of £485,649.00 for a Climate Change Mitigation and Adaptation Project. The project due to be completed in March 2015, aims to build capacity of Village Natural Resources management Committees on a community level and to enable national civil society organizations to improve resources for climate change at district and local levels. 

Water of The World

This creative video created by Sara, is a unique way of raising water awareness. According to Sara the creator;

 ” Our project began at the Microsoft Partners in Learning Global Forum in Washington, DC in November 2011. It will span the school year with learning and collaboration between the global students.”

This project included students ans teachers from the USA, Brazil, India and KSA.

Water and Sound Experiment

This water and sound experiment by Pj Liguori and Thomas Rawsthorn showcases how water reacts to sound.To see the making of this project visit; http://aquatempus.tumblr.com/.

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The next stop on my around the world trek was of course Melbourne. One of the great fascinations I have with Melbourne is Philip Island, mainly due to the penguin parade that I hear so much about. Curious, I went off to be one of the 3,500,000 visitors to the island every year.

When arriving at Philip island I learned that there was a local animal reserve.  In great efforts to preserve the local sea and wildlife, the state of Victoria had undertaken a buy back scheme in which all the houses in the local area near the main penguin nesting locations where brought back. This was turned into a national reserve that created a safe haven for the little penguin species. This consists of Swan Lake, Nobbies and the penguin parade reserve.

Swan lake is the only natural fresh water lake on Philip Island and is an important habitat for birds, reptiles and mammals. The reserve conserves this area through weed and pest control, also re-vegetation programs.

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Next up, the Nobbies which was one of the main destinations for the penguins after swimming onto the island. The Nobbies has a series of man made and natural nests for the penguins to live in, strategically placed for the eyes of the public. To ensure the penguins safety, the reserve has introduced vermin control to stop ferrel cats and foxes attacking the wildlife. The Nobbies reserve also holds educational talks and tours on the rest of their conservation work with the local community and conservation groups.

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Finally it’s the penguin parade reserve itself. This facility provides it’s patrons with a selection of gift and food shops that help pay for the parade which includes seating and special lighting when the penguins arrive after sun set.

Upon the parade starting, the hosts inform us that the parade is a non profit organisation and so all money payed to the park was put back into help with conservation and the study of these amazing creatures. This has resulted in a massive increase of the little penguins. On the night we visited over 1500 penguins ascended the beach to return home.

There are often questions into the effect tourism has on conservation, with a large amount often being seen as detrimental. Thankfully in the case of Phillip Island it can be seen that with strict guild lines put in place it can be a force for good to support conservation efforts.  I noted no photography was allowed as the penguins are very sensitive to light and their protection was paramount.

To keep track of my travels my blogs tweet to @merblogogy and you can also follow me @Elliot_Coomber

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